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Marchena Monuments

Marchena San Andrés Convent

Marchena Monuments

San Andrés Convent – Marchena

marchena-convento-de-san-andres-ave

The San Andrés Convent it is placed near the called door of Osuna, outside the walls of the city, near the Ducal Square City Halls, the San Juan Bautista Church, near the Santa María de la Mota Church and the the El Tiro Gate, in the andalusian village of Marchena.

It was founded in 1537 by Gonzalo Jiménez, as the main see for several Chaplaincies. It became the Mercedarias convent towards 1637, thanks to the patronage of Mr. Rodrigo Ponce de Leon, IV Duke of Arcos.

The temple was originally a Mudejar building from the 16th century. The Church, of Gothic-Mudejar style, is composed by a nave with a presbytery, a sacristy and a choir used bt a closed nuns order. The major altarpiece is from the 18th century, built in baroque style, and made of golden wood. The main figure is the image of the Virgen de las Mercedes. The image of San Andrés in placed in the attic. On the left wall of the nave, there is a notable painting on board attributed to Luis de Morales which deserves a special mention. It represents a Christ with the cross on his back.

Through the convent revolving pass-throuht, the nuns sell pastries for the most discerning palates.

San Andrés Convent of Marchena

History

The brick, masonry and rammed earth church has a single nave with pilasters and semicircular arches, a false barrel vault with lunettes and a dome on pendentives with a lantern and eight ribs. The roof is tiled, gabled with a pair and knuckle frame. The sacristy, behind the presbytery, is covered with a false groin vault. There are two choirs, one high at the foot of the church, and another low that opens to the presbytery on the side of the Epistle. The church is accessed after an atrium through an 18th-century gate with caretonados. The brick façade is Mudejar with a pointed arch and finished off with merlons. The church is baroque from the 17th century and is built on a Mudejar chapel. Read more…


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